Why This Matters: A Day Without Women

Why This Matters: A Day Without Women

A contributor for this month's theme reminds us of a basic economic question: We value our time, so how do we spend it?

So if you value women's rights, how do you spend it to have the greatest impact? Do you help one person a great deal? Support an organization that has a wide reach? Or do you make a statement with your presence - or absence?

The answers are personal and different for everyone. Sometimes the answers change at different points in one's life, or in response to political events.

For International Women's Day 2017, the organizers of the Women's March on Washington called for "A Day Without Women," calling for women to walk out of work, even unpaid work at home, to send a message about the importance of women. (Other actions included wearing red or refusing to spend money other than at women- and minority-owned or local businesses.) They were joined in this by the International Women's Strike (U.S. platform here.)

Walkouts have a long history, especially with unions, and were at the origin of International Women's Day. Those first walkouts drew both praise and criticism. Not much has changed.

Whatever you chose to do on International Women's Day, it's important to be aware of the symbolism of your actions, and to understand multiple sides of an issue.

As the latest wave of feminism continues to develop, conversations about complex issues are happening. Here are three points of view we think are worth considering:

This woman is proudly at work on ‘A Day Without Women’

School closures on ‘Day Without a Woman’ draw mixed response

A "long read" touching on the history of striking, and what intersectionality means for today's women strikers: A Day Without a Woman was about solidarity, not privilege

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